Kinship of the Black Dog: Robin Williams and Bipolar

Finding out about a celebrity’s death doesn’t usually affect me much, but when I read that Robin Williams committed suicide, it hit me hard. As you may know, Robin Williams battled Bipolar Disorder in addition to serious addiction issues, and it’s being reported that he had been fighting a long, severe cycle of depression at the time of his death. Unfortunately, as a member of the Kinship of the Black Dog, I know the hideousness of that endless war of attrition… I really do… And it not only does it break my heart that it overtook him, but it also scares the hell out of me. It makes me doubt myself and my own resolve to never off myself… that one day I might not be strong enough to keep fighting the good fight… even though all that I have to live for has pushed me to fight for my sanity time and time again. No matter how bleak things have gotten for me, I’ve always been rational enough to know that the darkness will eventually pass, and that it’s the chemistry in my brain. I’ve retained control of my actions… and it scares me to death to think that…

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When the Doctor Says “You’re Bipolar”

“I know what’s wrong with you,” the doctor said, as she folded her hands behind her head. “You’re Bipolar. You have Bipolar Disorder, Type II. That’s why the antidepressants you’ve been taking work great for awhile, then just STOP working. Your body chemistry must have a mood stabilizer to temper the antidepressant, or you’ll have too much serotonin. This shoots you up, and then you crash.” I sat there in silence, then pasted a well-practiced smile on my face, the mask that’s helped me coast publicly through long periods of misery. And said, “Well it’s good to know why the meds quit working… what’s the difference in Bipolar and Bipolar II?” She answered me with a somewhat condescending tone. “As a Bipolar II patient, you won’t experience the wild manias that are associated with Bipolar Disorder. Manias are where one goes on alcohol binges, spending sprees or engages in other risky behaviors. You instead have Hypomania, which includes severe irritability, insomnia, pressured speech and other milder but still invasive symptoms. As a Bipolar II, you also have more severe depressive episodes than someone with classic Bipolar Disorder.” She paused a second and looked at me meaningfully, then said “That’s why…

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Guest Post: Megsanity on “Bipolar Disorder and Motherhood”

I’m so excited to introduce my amazing Guest Writer today, Megsanity. I asked her to talk a little bit about the outdated notion and misinformation regarding whether women with Bipolar Disorder can safely have children, and she was incredibly awesome to agree…. and write the article that same day! I was blown away when I read her take on Bipolar Disorder and Motherhood, and I deeply wish this article had been available when I received the blow of “No More Kids” at MY diagnosis. Please share this around and let everyone know what the new research is showing on this subject! But first, a little about the author, so you can see the high level of authority with which she can talk about this subject:  “Megsanity” is the alias of a licensed clinical therapist who has spent the majority of the last ten years working as the Clinical Director/Vice President of Clinical Operations for a JCAHO accredited mental health facility. She needed an anonymous outlet where it was acceptable to drop the F-bomb like it’s hot, so she started Megsanity. Women, psychology and expletives, Megsanity is a blog that strives to promote an understanding of female psychology through recent and…

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