What Does Buggy Mean? Talk Southern to Me Episode 1

Starting today, each Tuesday I will be posting a “Southernism”, Southern phrase, or a word we use in the South that isn’t used elsewhere (that I know of) in the United States. Some of them are funny, and even if you’re not from here or have never heard of these phrases, feel free to start interjecting them into your daily conversations. You just might start a trend! Today we will be discussing the word “Buggy”. Now when a Southerner says “go get me a buggy” what does Buggy mean in this phrase? Many will think of a stroller for babies, a carriage that is pulled behind horses, or an adjective meaning crazy. That’s not what I or most of the people around here mean when they use this word. A Buggy is another word for a shopping cart! It does KIND of look like a carriage, but I guess that would make me the horse? Or I could see where as grocery cart could kind of look like a baby stroller/pram, but then that would mean the food is my baby? Next week we will be discussing the meaning of “Y’all” and its correct usage. Be sure to read it…

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How to Cook Greens, Southern Style: Bearded Farmer Recipe

Once again we are blessed here on Herd Management to have Chef Eric Bern, more popularly known as The Bearded Farmer, giving us one of his recipes for cooking up a Southern favorite. Let’s learn how to cook Greens! Whether they be Collard, Turnip, or Mustard, they’re a Southern cooking staple and even if you’re not from Here it’s a fantastic thing to be able to prepare. They’re readily available this time of year due to being planted in early Fall as a cold weather crop. For starters, greens are cheap! You can get them for low prices, especially if you’re willing to stop at a roadside produce stand and support a local farmer. You want good nutrition? Check out these impressive nutritional stats: One cup of boiled turnip greens contain 29 calories, 2 grams of protein, 0 gram of fat, 6 grams of carbohydrate, 5 grams of fiber and 1 gram of sugar, 660% of your daily needs for vitamin K, 220% of vitamin A, 66% of vitamin C, 42% of folate, 20% of calcium needs, 14% of vitamin E and 6% of iron. All of that Vitamin C factors in having the healthy skin and nails we all…

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Traditional Southern New Years Day Meal

One of the best parts about being Southern is the FOOD! We have a seemingly endless supply of amazing recipes and cooks to spare, so naturally on holidays food takes the center stage. For most of my life I’ve been eating the Traditional Southern New Year’s Day Meal and been told that the various dishes bring good luck for the New Year, but I never really knew the origin of the beliefs attached to them. Until now. The Southern Weekend has published my article on The Traditional Southern New Years Day Meal, so go check it out to learn why in the world we insist on eating pork, greens, and black eyed peas every January 1st. And for Heaven’s sake, don’t wash your clothes on New Years Day, or you’ll wash the luck right out of your year. I know it’s true because my grandmother told me so.

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